Intro - Setting - Rules - Char Gen - Downtime - Costumes - Who's Who - Past Events - Future Events - Forum - Facebook

Masquerades & Massacres

Creating a Character - Merits - Flaws - Example Characters

I want the character generation system to be largely about three things: how eligible the character is for marriage, how much political clout they wield, and how good they are in combat. The first two are quite closely linked, as marriage is generally used as a tool to advance someone's political status & power. At the end of the day the aim of these events is: find a partner who will advance you're family's political position; survive the monster attack; hope the partner also survives; marry said partner.

Creating a Character - Merits - Flaws - Example Characters

Creating a Character

Below are all the character creation rules. So submit a character, please send a completed character form to miteyheroes@googlemail.com and we'll then add you to the Who's Who.

What Characters are Appropriate?
You can play all sorts of characters- lords & ladies, characters like those in Austen, intellectuals, military officers, servants, adventurers, industrialists, and anyone else you can imagine attending a party in the early 1820s. If your character doesn't quite fit into the Merits & Flaws system described below, feel free to email miteyheroes@googlemail.com to discuss your ideas.

Time-limits for Character Creation
We encourage most people to play original characters of their own devising. These characters must be submitted at least two weeks in advance, with background details, in order for Dance Cards (see the Rules section) and Plot to be produced. Any players who do not submit characters in time (or who's characters die) will have to play pre-generated characters created by the GMs, but we promise these will be interesting characters with plot hooks and so on.
Historical characters or characters from works of fiction may be played, but you should email miteyheroes@googlemail.com to discuss them, at least a month in advance of the event you want to play at. Characters with the Unnatural Merit must also be submitted to miteyheroes@googlemail.com at least a month in advance.

Background
Each player should consider the background for their character. Decide their father's name, their home county, whether they are married or not, and what political party they support (are they a pro-Reform Whig or a Tory?) You may also want to submit more details about your character's life history- we welcome this as it gives us more information to theme plot around, but it is not compulsory.

Merits & Flaws
A starting character may choose three Merits. All Merits have three ranks, however normal starting characters may not have more than two ranks in one Merit. The third rank is reserved for NPCs, character advancement and/or characters based on historical or fictional individuals (which must be submitted a month before the event, as discussed above). The only Merit that can be taken multiple times at character generation is the Education Merit.
Each character also has the option of taking Flaws. For each Flaw, they get an extra Merit. You may take up to four Flaws at character generation.
No Flaws can be taken multiple times at character generation.

Groups & Linked Characters
Characters may arrive with their friends and family. Historical and fictional examples include:

  • The Bingleys and Mr Darcy arriving together in Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice
  • The Longbourn/Meryton Set (most of the other characters in Pride & Prejudice, who all live near each other)
  • The Carlton House Set, the Prince Regent's group of close friends
  • The Blue Stockings Society, a salon led by Elizabeth Montagu where women met to discuss literature
  • Lily's Formation, the main characters in Naomi Novik's Temeraire
Groups and linked characters are especially good as they allow groups of friends to all play linked characters, and interact lots. In addition, it means you can try to accumulate lots of useful Merits between your allies! Please choose a name for your group, just to help with our admin.
A related idea is having characters with the Lower Class Flaw attending as servants of another character. A rich lady with a maid and a bodyguard is a classic set-up, as is the military officer with a few of his men.

Advancement
Any characters who have survived an event will find themselves changed by what they experience. To represent this, they may take one new Flaw after each event (and for each Flaw they take they gain an extra Merit, as normal). Serious injuries gained through Healing count as new Flaws, giving you extra Merits- this is the only way you may gain multiple Flaws that are the same.
Characters may also, with GM approval, remove previous Merits or Flaws and choose new ones to replace them.
Any character that manages to successfully negotiate a marriage to someone with more Fame, Fortune or Landed Family than themselves gains one free level in that Merit.
Finally, some characters may receive additional free Merits from the GM.

Creating a Character - Merits - Flaws - Example Characters

Merits

Archery
"Try not to shoot my dogs" - Jane Austen's Emma (film adaptation)
Archery has been superseded in battle by firearms due to their increased accuracy, however it has found a new lease of life as a social pursuit. Target archery is popular among both sexes, meaning this is perhaps the most suitable combat Merit for ladies.
If you have this Merit, you have had experience in target archey, or simply show a natural aptitude.
If you do not take this Merit, you may still use any bow or crossbow (of up to 30lbs at 28" draw) to fire foam-tipped arrows, however you may only call “Ha!” when a foam arrow you fire hits someone.
Archery 1: Once per event you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!” when a foam arrow you fire hits someone.
Archery 2: Once per fight you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!” when a foam arrow you fire hits someone.
Archery 3: Three times per fight you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!” when a foam arrow you fire hits someone.
Examples:
Mr George Knightley, from the film adaptation of Jane Austen's Emma (1);
Miss Emma Woodhouse, from the film adaptation of Jane Austen's Emma (2);
Robin Hood, from works of popular fiction (3)

Boxing
The two men had stood up to each other, Jim as light upon his feet as a goat, with his left well out and his right thrown across the lower part of his chest, while Berks held both arms half extended and his feet almost level, so that he might lead off with either side. For an instant they looked each other over, and then Berks, ducking his head and rushing in with a handover-hand style of hitting, bored Jim down into his corner. It was a backward slip rather than a knockdown, but a thin trickle of blood was seen at the corner of Jim's mouth. - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Rodney Stone
Boxing is a very popular sport among men in our time, spanning the class divide. Boxing champions are the sports superstars of the day, and give instruction in unarmed combat to rich clients. Most boxing matches are technically illegal, but this does nothing to stop their appeal. If you take this Merit, your character has been taught how to fight unarmed- either powerful punches, or arm-locks and wrestling. Note that you may not actually grapple with people, so arm-locks are represented using the "Freeze!" call.
If you do not take this Merit, your character may not call any damage when fighting unarmed. Other characters are encouraged to react to such attacks in a cinematic manner- falling over, staggering backwards, gasping for air, or whatever seems appropriate.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's story Rodney Stone is highly recommended reading for people interested in professional boxing
Boxing 1: You may call “Ha!” each time you strike someone in unarmed combat. Once per event, when you strike someone in unarmed combat, you may call "Take That!" or "Freeze!" instead of "Ha!"
Boxing 2: You may call "Ha!" each time you strike someone in unarmed combat. Once per fight, when you strike someone in unarmed combat, you may call "Take That!" or "Freeze!" instead of "Ha!"
Boxing 3: You may call "Ha!" each time you strike someone in unarmed combat. Three times per fight, when you strike someone in unarmed combat, you may call "Take That!" or "Freeze!" instead of "Ha!"
Examples:
Joe Berks, from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Rodney Stone (2)

Cannon
"There's a lot of smoke in a battle. Our cannon, their cannon. Our shot, their shell. Our volleys, their volleys. ... You don't see a battle. You hear it. Black powder blasting by the ton on all sides. Black smoke blinding you and choking you and making you vomit." - Bernard Cornwell, Sharpe's Eagle
"We duel with cannon." "But I thought we were fighting with swords?""Swords! What do you think this is, the Middle Ages? Only girls fight with swords these days." - Blackadder the Third
"Splendid chaps the ordnance, but dammem, a powder monkey's a powder monkey, ain't he? Let 'em fill the cartridges and bore the guns, but don't expect me to know a .577 from a mortar! What concern is that of a gentleman- or a soldier, either? Hey? Hey?" - George Macdonald Fraser, Flashman at the Charge
Artillery is an important part of Regency warfare, causing great damage to blocks of troops, fortifications or ships. However cannons are not very effective against individuals, and so for the purposes of this game they will be mainly used to inspire shock and awe, forcing enemies into cover.
If you take this Merit, your character has been trained in the use of a cannon and can fire one.If you own a cannon phys-rep, feel free to bring it- but please do NOT bring any blackpowder. Loading a cannon requires two people, both of whom must have the Cannon Merit. If they are mismatched, it takes the shorter time (so if someone with Cannon 1 and someone with Cannon 3 are loading together, it only takes 20 seconds).
If you do not take this Merit, you may not use a cannon.
Cannon 1: You may fire a cannon, but you load it inefficiently. It takes you 60 seconds to load a cannon, and then you may call "Boom!"
Cannon 2: You may load and fire a cannon at battlefield efficiency. It takes you 30 seconds to load a cannon, and then you may call "Boom!"
Cannon 3: You may fire a cannon, and are amazingly accurate. It takes you 20 seconds to load a cannon, and then you may call either "Boom!" or "Take That!"
Examples:

Education
"I will not lead you on, ungarded and ardent as I then was, to your destruction and infallible misery. Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge." - Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
Really there is hardly any pleasure equal to that of acquiring knowledge. And yet, at the same time, every step we make in the path of learning opens to us so vast a number of endless vistas and newer tracks (just as in our forest rambles), that it quite discourages one. It is hopeless to think of exhausting all the stores of knowledge. - From the diary of Emily Shore
Education in the Regency period can be a bit haphazard. Some individuals have private tutors, excellent schools, study at Oxford or Cambridge and then join one of the academic societies. Other individuals are considerably less educated than people in the 20th centyry. Wealth plays a large part in this! Whilst higher education is not open to women, many are educated by a governess, through home study (often in their father's libraries) or in a school, and many women are very intellectual- the Royal Institution often has as many women in the audiences of their scientific lectures as men.
If you take this Merit, your character has been educated in some formal capacity, or shows natural intelligence. This both entitles you to a bit of respect and means the GMs will give you additional briefings when they deem it relevant. You may get relevant in-game abilities. If you want to take this Merit, especially at Level 2 or higher, you should do some research on Regency opinions in your chosen subject!
Note that this is the only Merit you may take multiple times, in order to cover multiple specialities. Anyone with multiple versions of this Merit will be assumed to be very well-educated!
If you do not take this Merit, your character has not had a good education, or is rather stupid.

Education 1: You are clever, and have had a broad general education. This will include a knowledge of French, Latin and probably Greek; and a smattering of general knowledge on other subjects. In addition, you may choose one fairly mundane speciality, which has the potential to be an useful game skill. These are examples, but are not exhaustive:

  • Herblore or Basic Surgery means you can use simple knowledge to help wounded or ill people, but do not have any sort of professional qualification (see the rules on Healing).
  • Natural Philosophy (which covers most of what's now seen as Science) might enable you to disect a creature and learn about it.
  • Ancient History could be useful in piecing together the plot at events.
  • Gossip & Scandal would mean you get more detailed descriptions of people on your Dance Card, and may be told secrets about people's Terrible Secrets.
  • Political Theory would aid you between games, in influencing political thought.
  • Languages would also not generally be useful in-game, but would make you an attractive prospect for some careers.
  • Engineering would be more useful in-between events, but would enable you to shape the world and gain fame and fortune in the industrial revolution.
  • Poetry & Literature, or Theology, or so on would probably not be very useful, but might be good for impressing people...
Education 2: You have a good university education, or have read very widely. You have an excellent general education, plus may pick a speciality which may be one of the examples on the list above (which you know more about than someone with Education 1) or something more arcane, obscure or complicated (see the list below). You can talk about your speciality at great length, if you find people willing to listen. In addition, you may have a doctorate in your speciality and be a lecturer at a university. Education 2 is more likely to give you some useful in-game ability. Some examples:
  • Medicine or Surgery means you are a Physician or Surgeon. See the rules on Healing.
  • Theology means you may be a priest, monk or nun. This gets you some respect- being a priest is regarded as a perfectly good job for a younger son who will not inherit, for example. It also means you can Bless things, which helps when hunting Unnatural Creatures.
  • Law means you may be a lawyer, a similarly respected profession.
  • Magical Theory is fairly useless unless combined with Unnatural 1. You should read "Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell" to understand Magic in this world.
  • Unnatural Creatures means you know all about faeries, vampyres, shape-shifters and so on- their strengths, their weaknesses, and how to exploit their weaknesses.
Education 3: You are one of the country's foremost experts on your chosen speciality and almost certainly have a professorship at Oxford or Cambridge, or are a Judge, or a Bishop, or similar. This will give you much more social prestige than Education 2.

Examples:
Miss Elizabeth Bennet, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (1);
Dr Stephen Maturin, from the works of Patrick O'Brian (2: Medicine, 1: Natural History, & 1: Languages);
The Ladies of Grace Adieu, from the works of Susanna Clarke (2: Magical Theory);
Mr Norrell, from the works of Susanna Clarke (3: Magical Theory)

Fame
(Drawlight) belonged to a certain breed of gentlemen, only to be met with in London, whose main occupation is the wearing of expensive and fashionable clothes; (who) pass their lives in ostentatious idleness, gambling and drinking to excess and spending months at a time in Brighton and other fashionable watering places. - Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
How to describe Lord Wellington? How can such a thing be necessary or even possible? His face is everywhere one looks - a cheap print upon the wall of the coaching inn - a more elaborate one, embellished with flags and drums, at the top of the Assembly-room staircase. Nowadays no young lady of average romantic feeling will reach the age of seventeen without purchasing at least one picture of him. - Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
The Regency is a period where the cult of celebrity was booming. Fuelled by newspapers looking for people to comment on and digested by a public with little else to entertain them, individuals can become hugely famous. The opinions of such an individual can influence vast swathes of the population, so these people sometimes find themselves becoming political players. For example a few decades ago the political contest was mainly seen as a fight between the Tory hostess Jane, Duchess of Gordon and the Whig hostess Georgiana Cavendish- both of whom were famous for their style, opulent parties and complicated relationships
If you take this Merit, your character is famous. You must specify why: maybe you are a war hero, stunningly beautiful, incredibly stylish, extremely funny, a talented author, or any number of similar reasons. In terms of game mechanics, this means people will have a longer description of you on their Dance Cards. Also, Fame acts as a buff on your other Merits- an Officer with Fame may, at the GM's discretion, have a higher rank than Captain for example.
Fame 1: If your home county isn't London, Brighton or Bath you are one of the most famous leading lights of the area, but beyond your home county people have probably not heard much about you. If your home county is London, Brighton or Bath you move in the fashionable circles but are more a follower of fashion than a leader.
Fame 2: You are a minor celebrity. You may well move in the most fashionable circles in London and Bath, are occasionally written about in national newspapers, and are known throughout Britain. Members of the opposite sex probably fall over themselves for your attention. If you’re not married yet, everyone is amazed.
Fame 3: You are one of the most famous people in Britain. Everyone in the country knows about you, and your reputation extends world-wide. In centuries to come, you may well be one of the names that people remember.
Examples:
Mr Christopher Drawlight, from the works of Susanna Clarke (1: Style);
Captain William Laurence, from the works of Naomi Novik (2: War Hero);
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, the historical figure (3: Style);
Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington, the historical figure (3: War Hero);
Beau Brummel, the historical figure (3: Style);
Lola Montez, the historical figure (3: Style)

Fencing
"She can choose who she wants," Sharpe insisted. "Choose, Sharpie? Choose?" Hakeswill laughed. "Women don't choose, you soft bugger. Women get taken by the strongest. Says so in the scriptures, and if you stand in my way, Sharpie" - he pushed his sword hard forward - "then I'll have your spine laid open to the daylight". - Bernard Cornwell, Sharpe's Challenge
He came on guard, the blades grated between us, and then he twitched his wrist, quick as light, right and left... But Flashy's nobody's fool; I turned my wrist with his, and caught the cuts on my own blade. He cut again, and the blade rang on my cap, but I broke ground and let go a regular round-house slash at him, like a dragoon full of drink. - George Macdonald Fraser, Royal Flash
Swordfighting is highly praised as a military skill, and is also occassionally used for duels (but in England this is often seen as a bit old-fashioned compared to pistols).
If you have this Merit, you have had formal training in sword drill, or simply show a natural aptitude.
If you do not take this Merit, you may still use any LARP-safe close combat weapon, however you may only call “Ha!”
Fencing 1: Once per event you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!” when you strike someone with a bladed LARP-safe close combat weapon.
Fencing 2: Once per fight you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!” when you strike someone with a bladed LARP-safe close combat weapon.
Fencing 3: Three times per fight you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!” when you strike someone with a bladed LARP-safe close combat weapon.
Examples:
Lieutenant Harry Paget Flashman, from the works of George MacDonald Fraser (1);
Captain Jane Roland, from the works of Naomi Novik (2);
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell (3)

Firearms
"They've got muskets and they can all fire three or four shots a minute. Aimed at you. And they're going to kill you because you're so damn slow. If you don't kill them first then they will kill you, it is as simple as that." - Bernard Cornwell, Sharpe's Eagle
"They don't know Mr. Sharpe shot three dragoons out of the saddle in thirty seconds do they, Sgt. Harper?" "They certainly don't, Mr. Harris." - Bernard Cornwell, Sharpe's Enemy
Bryant paced over to Bernier and presented a pistol to him; then he came to me with the other... Bryant stepped back to be well out of the line of fire; the seconds and the surgeon took post beside him, leaving Bernier and me looking at each other about twenty paces apart... "The pistols fire on one pressure," called Bryant. "When I drop my handkerchief you may level your pistols and fire. I shall drop it in a few seconds from now." - George Macdonald Fraser, Flashman
Shooting is very popular- as a military skill, as a country pursuit for gentlemen or the more tom-boyish ladies, and also in duels.
If you have this Merit, you have had formal training in using guns, or simply show a natural aptitude. If you have a suitable phys-rep, feel free to bring it (or several!) Note that for this system you do not need to have a replica that can actually fire or that uses caps or similar (meaning foam-and-latex guns are allowed). Please do NOT bring any blackpowder.
If you do not take this Merit, you may use a pistol, rifle or musket to call "Ha!" at one individual, however you may not reload any firearms.
Firearms 1: You may use a pistol, rifle or musket. It takes you 30 seconds to load a firearm, and you may then call “Ha!” at one individual. Once per event you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!”
Firearms 2: You may use a pistol, rifle or musket with deadly accuracy. It takes you 15 seconds to load a firearm, and you may then call “Ha!” at one individual. Once per fight you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!”
Firearms 3: You may use a pistol, rifle or musket with deadly accuracy and speed. It takes you 10 seconds to load a firearm, and you may then call “Ha!” at one individual. Three times per fight you may call “Take That!” instead of “Ha!”
Examples:
Captain William Laurence, from the works of Naomi Novik (1);
Captain Jane Roland, from the works of Naomi Novik (2);
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell (3)

Fortune
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters. - Jane Austen, Pride & Prejudice
"If this man had not twelve thousand a year, he would be a very stupid fellow." - Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
"Money, my dear, does more than provide mere material comforts; it lifts the burden of cares from one's shoulders, it imparts vigour and decisiveness to all one's actions and a delicate clearness to the complexion. It puts one in good humour with oneself and all the world. When I was poor I was not fit to be seen." - Susanna Clarke, The Ladies of Grace Adieu
Money makes life considerably easier. Money can be used to buy seats in Parliament, to rent houses in London and Bath, and to hold splendid parties. And, in the Regency, there are lots of way to get money.
Inheritance, investments, industry or prize-money are all areas people can make a quick profit. The Lotteries are also hugely popular, and each week one individual gets lucky...
If you take this Merit then your character's family have a good house in London and Bath. You also have ready cash in abundance. This is very different from the Landed Family Merit, as an old family with lots of lands may not have much spare money. However the two can obviously be combined! The Fortune Merit cannot be combined with the Poor Flaw.
If you do not take this Merit, your character does not have a large house in London or Bath, so cannot hold parties there. You have an income of under £1,000 a year, or a total fortune of under £3,000.
Fortune 1: Your family is comfortably well-off, and they run a good house in London and Bath. You have a personal income of £1,000-£5,000 a year, or a fortune of up to £15,000 in total.
Fortune 2: Your family is stinking rich, and has one of the most fashionable London houses. Your father may sit in the House of Commons- alternatively, if you also have Landed Family 2, then you or one of your brothers may sit in the House of Commons. You have a personal income of £5,000-£15,000 a year, or a fortune of up to £45,000 in total.
Fortune 3: Your family is one of the wealthiest in the country, certainly the wealthiest in your county. Your family is probably a major political player, running one of the main factions. Your father and you or your brothers may sit in the House of Commons. They're probably not the Prime Minister, but they're the people funding him (or his rival...) Money is something you need not worry about!
Example:
Captain William Laurence, from the works of Naomi Novik (1);
Mr Fitzwilliam Darcy, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (2);
Lady Catherine De Bourgh, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (2);
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, the historical figure (3)

Landed Family
They gradually ascended for half-a-mile, and then found themselves at the top of a considerable eminence, where the wood ceased, and the eye was instantly caught by Pemberley House, situated on the opposite side of a valley, into which the road with some abruptness wound. It was a large, handsome stone building, standing well on rising ground, and backed by a ridge of high woody hills; and in front, a stream of some natural importance was swelled into greater, but without any artificial appearance. Its banks were neither formal nor falsely adorned. Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. ... At that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something! - Jane Austen, Pride & Prejudice
The Georgian period was the high-point of the English Country Aristocracy, a time when they commanded practically all of the countryside and lived lives of glorious excess. In the Nineteenth-Century, the aristocracy is on the decline, with the rise of the middle-classes and the industrialists threatening their hold on the nation. However the titled families are still hugely respected, and given great social honours.
If you take this Merit then your character's family has a country estate and a title to match. This gives you great social status, and means you could potentially host an event. You must include details of your family, including their title and the location of their estates, in your background. This cannot be combined with the Lower Class Flaw.
If you do not take this Merit, you do not have a large house in the country and you could not host an event.
Landed Family 1: A substantial estate, rolling fields, &c, with a large mansion. You’re probably the biggest landowners in your area. Your father will probably be a baronet or knight.
Landed Family 2: A huge estate, probably the biggest in your county, ruled from a sprawling mansion. You're probably a distant relation of the Royal Family. Your father will probably be a Peer, who sits in the House of Lords.
Landed Family 3: You are a close member of the Royal Family. Your father will be a Duke or a Prince. Or even the King...
Examples:
Mr Fitzwilliam Darcy, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (1);
Lady Catherine De Bourgh, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (2);
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, the historical figure (2);
King George IV, formerly the Prince Regent, the historical figure (3)

Luck
Bernier's right arm came up like a railway signal, and before I had even cocked my pistol I was looking into his barrel- a split second and it shot smoke at me and the crack of the charge was followed by something rasping across my cheek and grazing it... I fell back a step. Bernier was glaring at me, aghast that I was still on my feet, I suppose, and someone shouted: "Missed, by Jesus!" - George Macdonald Fraser, Flashman
Throughout the Battalion Sharpe was now believed to be a magic man, a lucky one, a man whom enemy swords and bullets could not touch. - Bernard Cornwell, Sharpe's Eagle
Some people are just lucky. Maybe it's fast reflexes, maybe God smiles on them, or maybe they're heroes in popular fiction. Whatever, the end result is the same: they seem almost impossible to kill!
If you take this Merit, you are exceptionally lucky. In-game, this primarily translated into a chance to ignore wounds.
If you do not take this Merit, you are not particularly lucky.
Luck 1: You may call “Missed!” once per event to negate a call of "Ha!", "Take That!" or "Grr!" against you. You also do not take any damage from "Boom!" calls.
Luck 2: You may call “Missed!” once per fight to negate a call of "Ha!", "Take That!" or "Grr!" against you. You also do not take any damage from "Boom!" calls.
Luck 3: You may call “Missed!” two times per fight to negate a call of "Ha!", "Take That!" or "Grr!" against you. You also do not take any damage from "Boom!" calls.
Examples:
Lieutenant Harry Paget Flashman, from the works of George MacDonald Fraser (2);
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell (3)

Officer, Army (Gentlemen only. Phys-rep required: a red military-style coat)
"(The Captain) looks very nice in his red coat, Blue breeches and red Sash, he is now sitting opposite to me and I can hardly write my letter for looking at him." - Private Letter
"Our officers of cavalry have acquired a trick of galloping at everything. They never consider the situation, never think of manoeuvring before an enemy, and never keep back or provide a reserve." - Wellington
"See, men are all the same. You marry them, you make a good home for them, but as soon as your back is turned, they're off to battle, and before you can say Jack Robinson, they're dead as doornails." - Bernard Cornwell, Sharpe's Revenge
Many younger sons of members of the gentry or nobility are sent to the Army, and it is thought to be a very dashing job with wonderfully smart uniforms and good prospects. Only the rich or the talented become officers, as commissions are normally purchased. Many young ladies have been seduced into marriage by the red uniform of a British Army officer.
Since Waterloo, the Army has been stuck in England, without any campaigns in which to prove their worth. This has lead to a general feeling of restlessness and boredom among many officers, who wish the country would find a new foe for them to fight...
If you take this Merit, your character is a commissioned officer in the Army. This will no doubt impress the ladies, and will also give you good prospects between events. The Officer, Army Merit may not be combined with the Officer, Navy or Officer, Aerial Corps Merits.
Officer, Army 1: You’re a Captain or Lieutenant in a foot or artillery regiment.
Officer, Army 2: You’re a Captain or Lieutenant in one of the cavalry regiments. The cavalry are the elites of the army, and combine this elite status with a very dashing and debonaire feel. However, they are seen by the infantry as impulsive, headstrong and not very tactically minded.
Officer, Army 3: You're a Captain or Lieutenant in one of the Household Cavalry regiments. These are the most elite soldiers in the army, in regiments with long and noble pedigrees, and they are renowned for their bravery and prowess.
Examples:
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell (1);
Lieutenant George Wickham, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (1);
Lieutenant Harry Paget Flashman, from the works of George MacDonald Fraser (2)

Officer, Navy (Gentlemen only. Phys-rep required: a blue or black military-style coat)
"There is a great deal more than mere seamanship required of a captain. Any damned tarpaulin can manage a ship in a storm and any housewife in breeches can keep the decks clean and falls just so; but it needs a headpiece and true bottom and steadiness, as well as conduct, to be the captain of a man-o'-war: and these are qualities not to be found in every Johnny-come-lately." - Patrick O'Brian, Master and Commander
The Navy is not quite as dashing as the Army, but it has compensations for a future partner. Whilst wives of Army officers can sometimes accompany them when they are on campaign, a Naval wife has to be resigned to her husband being away from home on long tours of duty. However, the Navy offers great opportunities to make lots of money by taking prizes. This has meant that posts in the Navy are seen as an investment, and a slightly poorer family (or a family with many sons) will often send sons to the Navy in the hope they will set themselves up. Like Army officers, the Naval captains mostly find the current peace disappointing. They want an enemy, so they can take prizes and make their fortunes...
If you take this Merit, your character is a commissioned officer in the Navy. This combines an attractive uniform with good money-making possibilities, making you a fine match for a lady. The Officer, Navy Merit may not be combined with the Officer, Army or Officer, Aerial Corps Merits.
Officer, Navy 1: You’re a Commander or Lieutenant on an unrated vessel with less than 20 cannons. The larger ones are brig-sloops or sloop-of-wars, normally with 2 or 3 masts and 14 to 18 cannons, commanded by Commanders. The smaller ones are gun-brigs with 2 masts or cutters with 1 mast and normally with 6 to 14 cannons, commanded by Lieutenants.
Officer, Navy 2: You’re a Captain or Lieutenant on any rated ship-of-the-line with up to 80 cannon. If it has up to 44 cannons, it is a 5th or 6th Rate Ship, a frigate (or possibly a razee). If it has up to 80 cannons, it is a 3rd to 4th Rate Ship, a true ship-of-the-line.
Officer, Navy 3: You're a Captain or Lieutenant on one of the great three-deck ships-of-the-line that act as flagships. These have 90 to 120 cannons, and are 1st to 2nd Rate.
Examples:
Captain Horatio Hornblower, from the works of C. S. Forester (1 or 2);
Captain Jack Aubrey, from the works of Patrick O'Brian (mainly 1)

Officer, Aerial Corps (Phys-rep required: a green military-style coat)
It meant an end to any seblance of ordinary life. ... If a hatchling let up put it into harness, duty forever tied you to the beast. An aviator could not easily manage any sort of estate, nor raise a family, nor go into society to any real extent. ... In peace-time they lived in a sort of wild, outrageous libertinage in small enclaves, generally in the most remote and inhospitable places in all Britain ... The prospect of entering their ranks could not be appealing to any gentleman raised up in respectable society. ... Laurence had only to think of the degree of his attention and affection which Temeraire commanded to realize he could have very little left to offer a wife, even on those rare occassions when he would be at his liberty. ... If marriage was an awkward proposition for a male aviator, it seemed nearly inconceivable for a female one. - Naomi Novik, Temeraire
Whilst the Army and Navy are fairly highly praised and well-regarded, the dragon-mounted Aerial Corps are widely seen as scum. Useful scum, who have fulfilled a vital role in the military for hundreds of years, but still scum. The Aviators live apart from society in coverts with their fearsome dragons, often have little breeding, manners or grace, and have a reputation as mavericks and libertines. To make matters worse, in the past few years society has been rocked by the scandal that they accept female officers. These females (NOT ladies!) are rumoured to be little better than whores, sleeping with all the officers with no regard for common decency or marriage. No sensible lady will associate with Aviators, let alone consider marrying one; only a gentlemen of very little taste would approach a female Aviator, and would not normally be considering marriage...
If you take this Merit, your character is a commissioned officer in the Aerial Corps, who fight on dragons. Officers in the Aerial Corps are regarded with a mixture of disgust and disdane by society, and you will be seen as a terrible marriage prospect. The Officer, Aerial Corps Merit may not be combined with the Officer, Army or Officer, Navy Merits.
Temeraire is required reading for anyone wishing to play an Officer of the Aerial Corps.
Officer, Aerial Corps 1: You’re the Captain or Lieutenant of a dragon with no particularly special ability.
Officer, Aerial Corps 2: You’re the Captain or Lieutenant of a dragon with a special ability ("Fire Breather", "Acid Spitter", "Night Sight", "Swift", "Superheavyweight")
Officer, Aerial Corps 3: You're the Captain or Lieutenant of a dragon with an almost unique special ability (for example the "Divine Wind" of Temeraire, contact us if you have more ideas)
Examples:
Capitaine Jean-Paul Choiseul, from the works of Naomi Novik (1);
Captain Jane Roland, from the works of Naomi Novik (2: Acid Spitter);
Captain William Laurence, from the works of Naomi Novik (3: Divine Wind)

Stout (Phys-rep required for Stout 2 or 3)
I had often looked upon the mighty arms and neck of the smith, but I had never before seen him stripped to the waist ... There was none of that white sleek skin and shimmering play of sinew which made Wilson a beautiful picture, but in its stead there was a rugged grandeur of knotted and tangled muscle, as though the roots of some old tree were writhing from breast to shoulder, and from shoulder to elbow. Even in repose the sun threw shadows from the curves of his skin, but when he exerted himself every muscle bunched itself up, distinct and hard, breaking his whole trunk into gnarled knots of sinew. His skin, on face and body, was darker and harsher than that of his youthful antagonist, but he looked tougher and harder, an effect which was increased by the sombre colour of his stockings and breeches. - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Rodney Stone
Mrs. Jennings, Lady Middleton's mother, was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar. - Jane Austen, Sense & Sensibility
The opulent life of the rich in the Regency, when a meal could contain around 20 courses, most of them featuring lots of meat juices and fat (even the sweat dishes), led inevitably to obesity. However there was also a cult of the body beautiful, with young men striving to have fashionable muscles.
If you have this Merit, you are either fat or muscular, meaning you can absorb more damage.
This Merit must be phys-repped, either through use of padding or by being actually quite large. Anyone who doesn't look skinny can be Stout 1; anyone who's noticeably larger than average can be Stout 2; Stout 3 requires you to be over 20 stone or wearing a lot of padding.
If you do not take this Merit, you are average, neither skinny nor fat.
Stout 1: You are definitely not scrawny. You have 4 body hits.
Stout 2: You are noticeably more muscular or fat than average. You have 6 body hits.
Stout 3: You are obese. Muscles alone aren't enough for this level! You have 9 body hits.
Examples:
Mrs Jennings, from Jane Austen's Sense & Sensibility (2);
Lieutenant Harry Paget Flashman, from the works of George MacDonald Fraser (2);
King George IV, formerly the Prince Regent, the historical figure (3)

Unnatural (Phys-rep required for some of these)
(A Faerie) was standing in the middle of the room: a tall, handsome person with pale, perfect skin and an immense amount of hair, as pale and shining as thistle-down. His cold, blue eyes glittered and he had long, dark eye-brows, which terminated in an upward flourish. - Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
Whilst creatures that are not fully human are not exactly common, they're not unknown. History tells of many great magicians who have made pacts with Faeries; popular gothick tales speak of humanoid creatures with unnatural tastes; and the Aerial Corps has flown to battle on sentient dragons for centuries. Whilst young people may delight to read tales about such figures, few people would trust them if they met them.
If you take this Merit, you are not a normal human. This will give you strange abilities or interesting bits of plot, and if you wish to play something Unnatural please email miteyheroes@googlemail.com at least a month in advance of the event- who will also discuss phys-reps. We are always interested in new Unnatural concepts, so don't feel these suggestions are comprehensive.
Unnatural 1: You're not quite a normal human. At Unnatural 1 you're generally not a horrific monster, but you're certainly not normal!
Currently available options are: Touched (mysterious people with purple fingernails, eyes or skin); Magic (people with the ability to do magic- needs to be paired with Educated: Magical Theory); Faerie Blood (there's a touch of the Fae in your family); Potential (ladies only- you might grow up to be a Buffy-style Slayer); and Daemonblood (you're partly daemonic).
Unnatural 2: You are something humanoid but definitely not human. You will be hugely distrusted by most humans, if they know what you are, but you'll probably seek to keep your secret.
Currently available options are: Faerie (you come from Faerie- it's recommended you read the works of Susanna Clarke before choosing this option); Slayer (ladies only- you're Regency Buffy); Daemonblood (you're very daemonic); Shape-Shifter (you're a werewolf, Jekyll & Hyde, or something along those lines); Vampyre (you're a vampyre, an immortal bloodsucker).
Unnatural 3: You are not even humanoid, but are of human intelligence. Dragons are the most widely known example of this, but other such creatures are rumoured to exist inside Faerie or possibly even on worlds beyond our own. This requires some seriously huge phys-reps, and will make you very unlikely to fit into society, but will also give large benefits. Mostly this'll be NPCs like Aliens and so on. But we're willing to consider PCs.
Currently available options are: Dragon (you're giant flying lizard); Daemonblood (you're mostly daemonic- coloured skin, horns, the lot!).
Examples:
Mr Tristran Thorn, from Neil Gaiman's Stardust (1: Faerie Blood);
Mr Norrell, from the works of Susanna Clarke (1: Magic);
The Man With The Thistledown Hair, from the works of Susanna Clarke (2: Faerie);
Vlad Tepes, Count Dracula (2: Vampyre);
Temeraire, from the works of Naomi Novik (3: Dragon)

Creating a Character - Merits - Flaws - Example Characters

Flaws

Coward
"All that is necessary for evil to succeed is that good men do nothing." -Edmund Burke
I dug my spurs in as they came tearing after me, with Iqbal wheeling after them in turn. He was bawling at me to turn and fight, the fool, but I had no thought but to get away from those hellish lance-points and the wolf-like bearded faces behind them. - George Macdonald Fraser, Flashman
"I would be astonished, astonished, if he were to prove shy. What makes you think he is?" "I do not say he is. I should be very sorry to say anything against a man's courage without proof. But..." - Patrick O'Brian, Master and Commander
The ideal man is brave and dashing, a hero who will fight for his home and country. Known cowards are scorned, seen as unmanly. On the other hand, cowardice in the face of monsters is rather more acceptable among ladies.
If you take this Flaw, you are a coward. If anyone uses the "Ha!" "Take That!" "Grr!" or "Boom!" call against you, and you survive without being Seriously Injured, you must try your hardest to run, to find a hole to hide in and gibber. You will only continue to fight if you have to, in order to cut a path of escape.
For obvious reasons, you may not combine this Flaw with the Foolhardy Flaw!
Examples:
Lieutenant Harry Paget Flashman, from the works of George MacDonald Fraser

Disfigured (Phys-rep required: facial scar)
He came around to make his bow, and nearly stumbled as he saw her clearly; she was not unhandsome, but her face was marred badly by a scar that could only have been made by a sword; the left eye drooped a little at the corner where the blade had just missed it, and the flesh was drawn along an angry red line all the way down her face, fading to a thinner white scar along her neck. - Naomi Novik, Temeraire
A massive, close-cropped, typical Prussian, whose fleshy face was wealed with a great sabre cut from brow to chin. - George Macdonald Fraser, Flashman
Warfare in this time is bloody and dangerous, with poor quality surgical techniques to patch up the wounded.
If you take this Flaw, your face is disfigured, probably due to a scar, to a degree that makes you less attractive and rather shocking in polite society.
Examples:
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell;
Captain Jane Roland, from the works of Naomi Novik

Doomed
Masquerades & Massacres is set in a time of Magic Curses, rubbish medical techniques and incredibly dangerous violence. It's a time when it's easy to die.
If you take this Flaw, the GMs will kill your character within the next 5 years of game time. This may be at a Main Event, a Player Event, a Linear or even during Downtime. You can suggest a way you'd like them to die, but we won't neccessarily choose that means of death. In addition, we may bend the rules in order to kill you. You may be hit by a un-healable injury, healing may go wrong, you have have a heart attack or catch a horrible illness. And it'll entirely be at our discretion.
Note that characters without this Flaw may still die at any Event (Main, Player or Linear), but we'll never kill characters without this Flaw in Downtime.

Elderly (Phys-rep required: either actually being over 40, or using grey hairspray/wigs)
Colonel Brandon ... was silent and grave. His appearance however was not unpleasing, in spite of his being in the opinion of Marianne and Margaret an absolute old bachelor, for he was on the wrong side of five and thirty; but though his face was not handsome, his countenance was sensible, and his address was particularly gentlemanlike. - Jane Austen, Sense & Sensibility
"Of course, when you’re old and fairly well pickled in drink you can forgive most things past, and reserve your spite for the neighbours who keep you awake at night and the children who get under your feet." - George Macdonald Fraser, Royal Flash
People who are too old to be regarded as marriagable prospects have far more freedom to act as individuals and are free from many of the restrictions society places upon unmarried young people.
If you take this Flaw, you will find romance hard to find, but on the other hand you will probably have a higher position in society- if you take the Fortune or Landed Family Merits then it is you who sits in Parliament or has a Title, not your father; if you take one of the Officer Merits then you may have a higher rank than Captain.
Examples:
Mr Norrell, from the works of Susanna Clarke;
Colonel Brandon, from Jane Austen's Sense & Sensibility;
Lady Catherine De Bourgh, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice

Faint
"Oh!" she fluttered. "Oh - oh, I am going to faint!" - Georgette Heyer, Powder and Patch
Many ladies live mainly inside, with little physical activity or excitement in their lives. When subjected to stress or surprises, these delicate young flowers often find themselves subject to fainting fits. Some of the more foppish gentlemen are much the same.
If you take this Flaw, you have a fragile temperament. If you hear the "Grr!" call (i.e. Unnatural creatures attacking people unarmed), you will swoon. You remain swooned either for ten seconds, or until shaken awake by anyone. You do not loose hit points by swooning.
You also swoon at other times. You can choose to swoon whenever you wish for dramatic purposes, and in addition everyone with this Flaw must swoon if a GM or NPC calls “SWOON”.
Examples:
Every Regency lady stereotype, from the works of Georgette Heyer

Feeble
If you take this Flaw, you're a lover not a fighter. You are utterly without any upper-body strength. If you stab someone, you do it so weakly it barely scratches them. If you try to shoot a gun, the recoil will practically knock you over and thus you'll miss.
In game, this means you may never make a damage call ("Ha!", "Take That!" or "Grr!")

Foolhardy
If you take this Flaw, you're a stark raving lunatic. Any time you see or hear combat, you will rush to take part, without any thought for personal safety or protecting the people you leave behind.
For obvious reasons, you may not combine this Flaw with the Coward Flaw!

Foreigner (Requires an accent)
"He was one of those to whom I could be rude with impunity – servants, tarts, bagman, shopkeepers, and foreigners." - George Macdonald Fraser, Royal Flash
Foreigners are regarded with a mixture of pity, mockery and contempt. On the one hand, imagine not being an Englishman. How terrible. How sad. On the other hand, did you know they eat _______? Imagine that! How funny (and disgustingly barbaric)!
If you take this Flaw, you are Foreign. This could be French, Spanish, Italian, Welsh, Irish, Scottish or something more exotic. Whilst the Raven King's Kingdom of Northern England is still technically a separate kingdom, being Northern does not count for this Flaw. It is assumed that Foreigners can speak English, but with a (possibly outrageous) accent.
Foreigners cannot affect Parliament (even the Irish/Scottish/Welsh don't have much power, they're so under-represented). Foreigners often wear distinctive national costumes, and their militaries do not neccessarily follow the Red=Army, Blue=Navy, Green=Aerial Corps colour scheme that England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland use.
Examples:
Capitaine Jean-Paul Choiseul, from Naomi Novik's Temeraire (French);
Lola Montez, the historical figure (Irish);
Jane, Duchess of Gordon, the historical figure (Scottish)

God-Fearing Englishman (or Englishwoman)
"Always remember that you are an Englishman and therefore have drawn first prize in the lottery of life." - Cecil Rhodes
If you take this Flaw, you are as English as they come. You're not a Catholic, you're not French, you're not a Werewolf or a Daemon. You're English, and Proud. This Flaw exists to encourage people to play perfectly normal standard English characters, like those in Jane Austen.
You may not combine this Flaw and Foreigner, Not In Communion or Unnatural.

Hatred
Many members of British society are very bigotted and biased. They will happily and continually curse foreigners, or Catholics, or poor people, or so on.
If you take this Flaw, you Hate one group of people. You must specify who it is you hate, and roleplay your hatred as much as possible- bringing you into conflict with people who fit the bill.
Examples:
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell (Upper Classes)

Lower Class
The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles... The modern bourgeois society that has sprouted from the ruins of feudal society has not done away with class antagonisms... Society as a whole is more and more splitting up into two great hostile camps, into two great classes directly facing each other - bourgeoisie and proletariat. - Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Manifesto Of The Communist Party
Social rank is hugely important in these times, and the lower classes are generally looked down upon by the upper and middle classes. Their lives are nasty, brutish and short- as are they.
If you take this Flaw, you’re from the Lower Classes. How terrible for you. You must have a good reason to be at the event (i.e. you might be an officer, a member of the clergy, a soldier accompanying an officer, a butler, a musician, a magician, an industrialist etc). Members of the Lower Classes with the “Fortune” Merit are New Money; filthy jumped-up Industrialists.
Examples:
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell

Nemesis
"His misfortunes!" repeated Darcy contemptuously; "yes, his misfortunes have been great indeed."
"And of your infliction," cried Elizabeth with energy. "You have reduced him to his present state of poverty--comparative poverty. You have withheld the advantages which you must know to have been designed for him. You have deprived the best years of his life of that independence which was no less his due than his desert. You have done all this!"
- Jane Austen, Pride & Prejudice
Some people find their lives haunted by one particular enemy, who seems to always be blocking their chances of success, taking their women, and spreading misinformation about them. Sometimes this is due to a slight, real or imaginary, sometimes it's just because they don't like you.
If you take this flaw, you have a nemesis. Email miteyheroes@googlemail.com to work out full details of your enemy- we may well try to make them into a PC or NPC at the event. This will almost inevitably lead to conflict!
Examples:
Lieutenant George Wickham, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (Mr Darcy)

Not In Communion
"I don't know exactly what they think, but everyone knows they are a sort of pagans, my dear. He's not making one of you, dear - is he?" - Sheridan Le Fanu, Uncle Silas
"The Papists are a very wicked crew, too, you know, with confession and all that," said Jack. "And they tried to blow up Parliament... There is no trusting them." - Patrick O'Brian, Master and Commander
"I object then, My Lords, to the admission of Roman Catholics to offices of trust and profit, because the principles of their Church are contrary to the allegiance which is due from subjects to their Sovereign, and inconsistent with the safety and tranquillity of the State. The grant of the Elective Franchise would be attended with still greater inconsistencies and mischiefs. I need not remind your Lordships, that Parliament is convened by the writ of summons expressly for the defence of the Kingdom and of the Church; not of the Kingdom only!" - Thomas Burgess, Bishop of St. David's, Speech to the House of Lords, 9th July 1823
There are many people who are not in the Church of England. Catholics, Jews, dissenters (non-C of E protestants), vehement Atheists, and members of fringe religions. This is not illegal, however they are not as respected, cannot sit in Parliament and do not have the vote- Catholic Emancipation (especially in Ireland) is one of The Big Political Debates.
If you take this Flaw, you are not in communion with the Church of England, and/or have not been baptised. You are probably Catholic, dissenting or Jewish. Note that only those born to or actively espousing a different religion (or Atheism) count, those who are simply not very religious members of the Church of England do not. Someone born to a different religion who has been baptised C of E also does not count (e.g. Disraeli couldn't take this Flaw).
You may not combine this Flaw and Foreigner, Unnatural: 2 or Unnatural: 3, as it's generally just assumed that they aren't properly C of E.
Examples:
Mr Percy Bysshe Shelley, the historical figure (Atheist);

Poor
"I am very much at a stand, here in Minorca. The patient I was to attend until the autumn has died... the war has cut me off from my little patrimony in Spain; and when I told you, some time ago, that I had not eaten so for a great while, I did not speak figuratively." - Patrick O'Brian, Master and Commander
"Do you realise, ma'am," demanded the Earl, "that you have helped my ward to throw herself away, at the age of seventeen, upon a penniless nobody, wholly dependent for his advancement upon the hazards of war?" - Georgette Heyer, Pursuit
Living the high life is expensive, and without a decent amount of money it is hard to maintain a smart lifestyle in these times. Poor people are seen as terrible marriage prospects, a drain upon their new family's resources.
If you take this Flaw, you are Poor. Your family have barely any money, and this is widely known. Alternatively, your family has some money but you cannot inherit any of it- which is very harmful to your marriage prospects! In practical terms, this translates into an annual income of less than £100, or a total fortune of less than £300.
Examples:
Dr Stephen Maturin, from the works of Patrick O'Brian;
Miss Tess Durbeyfield, from Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Scandalous
Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year. The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud; to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend. - Jane Austen, Pride & Prejudice
Our world is a world of balls and polite conversation around whist tables. Personality is everything, and even the richest & most eligible people may find themselves unwelcome if they are seen as scandalous. This might be as minor as being rude, or as major as being a libertine, or being known to be a debtor, or known to have committed a crime.
If you take this Flaw, you are in society's bad books. You’re a libertine, or shy, or boring, or violently angry, or insane, or extremely arrogant, or patronising, or reclusive, or crude, or incredibly addicited to laudanum. This requires lots of roleplaying! It is similar to Terrible Secret, but if you take this then your Flaw is openly known and discussed.
Examples:
Mr Norrell, from the works of Susanna Clarke (Boring);
Lady Catherine De Bourgh, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (Arrogant);
Jane, Duchess of Gordon, the historical figure (Crude)
Lord Byron, the historical figure (Libertine)

Terrible Secret
"I'll complete the story, though perhaps it might have been better untold. It was something rather shocking - indeed, very shocking; in fact, they insisted on suspecting him of having committed a murder." - Sheridan Le Fanu, Uncle Silas
Many people have secrets in their past. Maybe they keep them out of shame, hoping to later atone for their deeds. Or maybe they are still commiting their acts but keeping them hidden to ensure they can still be accepted in polite society- and gain new prey...
If you take this Flaw, you have a great and terrible secret. Maybe you all of your past is a lie, maybe you enjoy whoring, or have committed a major crime (and never been caught), or have eloped in the past, or have had a child outside wedlock, or have engaged in homosexual acts. You must give the GMs details in your background. This will not be universal knowledge at the start of the event- however the GMs may reveal your secret to some characters, which will cause you large problems.
Terrible Secret may not be combined with Unnatural 2 or 3- those characters obviously have a very major secret!
Example:
Lieutenant George Wickham, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (Eloper);
Lola Montez, the historical figure (False Past)

Weak (Phys-rep required: being skinny, walking with a limp, being pale, etc)
"Damn knee! Old leg wound, Hagman. Rain plays the devil with it!" "Aye. Brown paper and paraffin oil is the only cure for a contrary leg!" - Bernard Cornwell, Sharpe's Rifles
Not everyone in the Regency is a perfect specimen of physical health. Wasting diseases, old war wounds, old age or poor diets can all conspire to make people weak and easily hurt.
If you take this Flaw, you are not at your physical peak. This means you have -1 maximum body hit, and may also be more likely to suffer from illnesses.
Example:
Captain Richard Sharpe, from the works of Bernard Cornwell (War Wound);
Miss Jane Bennet, from Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice (Frail)

Creating a Character - Merits - Flaws - Example Characters

Example Characters

Lieutenant Hugh Pratt Moon, Incompetent Dragoon
A rich and dashing cavalry officer, who's secretly a terrible coward
Merits: Fortune 1; Luck 2; Officer, Army 2
Flaws: Coward; Terrible Secret (Whorer)

Captain Robert Blunte, Infantry Officer
The son of a whore, Blunte rose to become a Captain due to his fighting skills
Merits: Boxing 2; Firearms 2; Luck 2; Officer, Army 1
Flaws: Disfigured; Hatred (Upper Classes); Lower Class; Poor

Mademoiselle Bernadette Leguine, Beautiful Foreigner
A beautiful French refugee, famed for her cold unattainable beauty.
Merits: Archery 1; Education 1 (Poetry & Literature); Fame 2 (Style); Fortune 2; Landed Family 1
Flaws: Faint; Foreigner (French); Scandalous (Aloof); Weak (Frail)

Miss Jane MacSidh, Governess
A very studious, if slightly unnerving, young lady
Merits: Education 2 (Natural Philosophy); Education 1 (Herblore); Firearms 1; Unnatural 1 (Faerie Blood)
Flaws: Foreigner (Scottish); Poor

Mrs Alice Smith, Professional Widow
Born poor, but now hugely wealthly after a string of unfortunate accidents to previous husbands, involving kitchen implements or surprisingly poisonous herbs.
Merits: Education 2 (Gossip & Scandal); Education 1 (Herblore); Fencing 1; Fortune 2
Flaws: Elderly; Lower Class; Terrible Secret (Murderer)

Captain Charlotte Simon, Aerial Corps Officer
A bluff and dangerous young woman
Merits: Fencing 2; Firearms 1; Luck 1; Officer, Aerial Corps 2 (Acid Spitter)
Flaws: Disfigured; Scandalous (Crude); Scandalous (Child Outside Wedlock)

Creating a Character - Merits - Flaws - Example Characters

Intro - Setting - Rules - Char Gen - Downtime - Costumes - Who's Who - Past Events - Future Events - Forum - Facebook